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Friday, October 3, 2014

THE GALLI REPORT - Friday, October 03, 2014



The Galli Report newsletter

Friday, October 03, 2014


"When God answers prayer, he tends to do it in the South." So begins a brief news story on a prayer survey conducted by LifeWay Research, and sponsored by Max Lucado. Among other findings, only 37 percent of Americans pray for their enemies, and another 14 percent pray for God to smite them!

The lists in this article may not be, but they come close. Among other lists: Albert Einstein's demands to his wife, the objections of Charles Darwin's father to his son's first voyage to South America, and the options producers pondered for the last line of Gone with the Wind. We can be thankful they did not go with "Frankly, my dear, I don't give a straw."

I trust CT subscribers (of which there are many, I assume, reading this) have read Phillip Cary's review of Michael Horton's Ordinary: Sustainable Faith in a Radical, Restless World. If not, do so now. The reviewer and the author are two of my favorite writers addressing contemporary American spirituality. They bring a sobering maturity to the discussion.

A zealous referee recently penalized Husain Abdullah. The devout Muslim intercepted a pass and returned it for a touchdown, entering the end zone by sliding on both knees and then bowing in prayer. The referee gave 15 yards for unsportsmanlike conduct. There is some confusion as to whether Abdullah was penalized for sliding or praying, since religious expression on the field is permitted. At any rate, the incident reminds us that there are not only devout Christians on the gridiron, but more and more devout Muslims like Abdullah.

Here is a short YouTube video (2:42) with an illustration on the nature of gossip, from a movie starring the late Philip Seymour Hoffman. I'd say "enjoy," but the point of the story is a tad convicting. Nonetheless, it's moving.

Grace and peace,

Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Editor, Christianity Today

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