There is a lot going on in the Church of SoNoGo

South Park – North Park – Golden Hill

An Ecumenical Ministry in St. Patrick's Catholic Parish

Monday, August 1, 2022

Sculptor helped Pope Francis 'untie the knots' in Canada

In Ecuador, Catholic bishops help negotiate end to massive protests

For 18 days in June, much of the Ecuadorian economy shut down as a general strike focused on fuel prices, unemployment and environmental destruction caused protests across the country, reports Eduardo Campos Lima.

The strike was suspended June 30, largely due to efforts undertaken by Ecuador's Catholic bishops to mediate among union groups and the national government. The church was invited to participate after previous attempts at dialogue had failed — and has been trying to show the authorities that social peace depends on listening to the poor.

Archbishop Luis Cabrera of Guayaquil, who heads the bishops' conference of Ecuador, or CEE, had asked, via video, for dialogue, then the episcopate issued a statement June 23 calling for a truce and inviting the protesters and the government to negotiate solutions. The Confederation of Indigenous Nationalities of Ecuador, or CONAIE, the major organization behind the general strike, did not initially accept the call for a truce, claiming it did not see any possibility for dialogue. Yet as the crisis intensified, the protest leaders changed their minds.

Read more of this story here.

More background:


Sculptor helped Pope Francis 'untie the knots' in Canada

In the same way that the 16th-century Renaissance artists left an indelible mark on the Vatican through work that still manages to communicate centuries later, in recent years, it's been the work of Timothy Schmalz, a Canadian-born sculptor, who has taken the messages of Francis' papacy and chiseled them into permanent form.

NCR Vatican correspondent Chris White reports that a year ago this week, Schmalz was putting the final touches on a new work inspired by one of Pope Francis' favorite devotions to Mary: Undoer of Knots.

When Schmalz heard that the pope was planning to visit his home country, he approached the Canadian bishops with images of his new bronze sculpture. Those images were sent to the Vatican and, according to Schmalz, it was Francis who said he wanted to give it as a permanent gift to the Indigenous peoples of Canada during his visit.

Read more of this story here.

More background:


More headlines

No comments: