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Friday, December 5, 2014

THE GALLI REPORT - Friday, December 05, 2014



The Galli Report newsletter


Friday, December 05, 2014


Here are some pleasant thoughts regarding Christmas travel: I've noted previously "How Sneeze Particles Travel Inside an Airplane." Now I'm reading that aisle seats in particular "are the worst places for your well being." Apparently, "aisle seats contain much more germs than window seats. This is mostly because passengers touch them to keep their balance, often when walking back from the restroom." So much for my fondness for aisle seats.

Hipsters take a lot of grief these days. But they do a lot of things right, like collecting vinyl records. In the UK alone, over a million have been sold in 2014, an 18-year high. And most of the sales have been attributed to hipsters who think mp3 files are so yesterday. I'll have to find my box of vinyls and see what I own still—maybe some old Christmas albums! What I don't own, however, is a turntable. Alas.

There are few things new under the sun, but one is generalship. What an ancient general lost sleep over, and what a modern general worries about—well, it's different. For one thing, ancient generals didn't think it was their job to feed their troops. They would have been perplexed if asked how they do it; it would be like us asking the mayor of Chicago how he feeds his city. The article concludes that the ancient style of leadership—"joyful, heroic, charismatic, inspiring—is far more likely to be found in a Silicon Valley CEO than in an Army general."

So says the apostle Paul. I end this edition on a sobering if ultimately joyful note: It's been a tough year for humanity. Just the type of year during which Christians can step up and "complete the sufferings" of Christ, bearing the burden of suffering with calm hope. What it means to "complete" and "bear" such suffering, well, that is the argument of yours truly in this editorial.

Grace and peace,

Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Editor, Christianity Today

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