Friday, October 24, 2014

THE GALLI REPORT - Friday, October 24, 2014


The Galli Report newsletter

Friday, October 24, 2014


If you want to have a bigger brain, you may want to give up playing chess. Recent studies show that playing chess shrinks the brain. Then again, maybe having a bigger brain, with more brain cells, is not the way to get smart. That is why scientists say the findings are "difficult to explain on the basis of current knowledge." Maybe the brain is a lot more complex than many popular neuroscience articles have led us to believe.

Calvinists have a reputation for being, at best, hard to like, and at worst, self-righteous and arrogant. Part of the problem here is that, yes, Calvinists (like other Christians) are still sinners. Another problem is that we tend to think Calvinists can be all lumped together into a heartless predestinarian mold. Not true if you look at their history, which Oliver Crisp has done in Deviant Calvinism: Broadening Reformed Theology. Kevin P. Emmert's recent interview with Crisp draws out some of his surprising conclusions.

As a society, we are rightfully upset with running back Adrian Peterson whipping his 4-year-old. Yet few have noted that he does not live with this boy, and has had seven children with five different women. While our culture demonstrates a deep concern for children, it also shows a decided lack of interest in the integrity of the family, which is essential for the health of children. Why the American family is in disarray, and what experts think about this, is the subject of a book reviewed in this article. Many experts have no idea of what to do. But reading this piece made me grateful to be in an institution—the church—that gives a lot of attention to the moral and spiritual health of the family.

In subscribing to an editor's newsletter, you have tacitly agreed to be directed toward articles with a grammatical bent. I try to point only to discussions that are both entertaining and instructive. Like this one, on the excessive use of adverbs. I would gladly say it is very good, but then I would be needlessly contributing to the problem.

Grace and peace,

Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Editor, Christianity Today

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