Friday, July 25, 2014

THE GALLI REPORT - Friday, July 25, 2014


The Galli Report newsletter







Friday, July 25, 2014


Like most boomers, I remember where I was when I heard that President Kennedy had been shot—in my 6th grade class—as well as the sad events of the following days. I've never been fascinated with who really shot him, but I couldn't stop reading "Dallas Killers Club," in which the author reasons that the Mafia murdered Kennedy. It's not a new idea, but I found it well argued, if not definitively proved. Enjoy this week's long read.

We live, as they say, in interesting times. And one of the interesting things about these times is the revolution in sexual ethics, both outside and inside the church. Rod Dreher has some keen observations about how sexual ethics lie at the heart of "traditional Christianity." Bill Leonard's brief historical survey seems to reinforce the point. It's not that orthodox Christians are neurotic about sex, as critics assert. Instead, we have a tightly integrated theology that cannot divorce the body from the spirit.

You might want to play Jim Croce's "Roller Derby Queen" in the background while you read "Roller Derby Girls." Does the sport empower or degrade women? I don't know. But like the author, I've enjoyed the matches I've watched, starting back in the 1960s on our small black-and-white TV. Apparently there is a revival of the sport.

Christianity Today first profiled Chinese Christian (and dissident) lawyer Gao Zhisheng in 2009. The year before, he'd been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize. By the time we published our profile, he'd been whisked away by authorities and secretly detained. We've followed his plight, in part because I once read a book by a former prisoner of the Soviet Union. She said she and her fellow believers were heartened whenever they learned that Americans remembered them, and worked and prayed for their release. At CT we can't remember every imprisoned believer, but we can remember a few. Gao was one I wanted us to remember. So periodically, we've updated his story.
Now news comes that he may be released soon. Stay tuned to Gleanings for more updates.

Grace and peace,

Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Mark Galli
Editor, Christianity Today

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