Tuesday, September 19, 2017

On teaching the liberal arts


George Weigel on the “lessons in hope” he received from John Paul II | Carl E. Olson | The papal biographer’s new book describes his relationship with Pope John Paul, as well as the great challenges the pope faced in the final years of his life.

The Modern Malaise and the End of the World | Dale Ahlquist | The end of the world is more real than the world. The Creator is more real than the creation. The end of time is the beginning of eternity, when time’s urgencies dissolve.

A “tough guy” priest, in the gulag and beyond | Jim Graves | Father Walter Ciszek is known for his courage while imprisoned in the Soviet Union. But his spiritual writings show him to be “a saint of the ordinary life.”

A Gift from Edith Stein (1891-1942) | Francis Etheredge | Why I regard Edith Stein as a Mother of the Council, and a Modern Mother of the Church.

Ave and Irma: How this small Catholic university weathered the storm | Meryl Kaleida | Ave Maria University rode out Hurricane Irma giving shelter and aid to the poor and needy from the local community.

On teaching the liberal arts | James Matthew Wilson | My maturation as a professor came when I learned to love ideas more by way of coming to love them through—in pilgrimage with, in communion with—my students.

The refined, problematic casuistry of Abp. Fernández’s defense of chapter 8 of “Amoris Laetitia” | Fr. D. Vincent Twomey, SVD | Archbishop Fernández’s essay on the controversial eighth chapter has only raised more questions and created further confusion.

Cardinal Sarah, “terrorism of thought,” and the fight for faith | Jerry Salyer | In certain key respects the struggle between predominantly urban revolutionaries and predominantly rural Christians during French Revolution foreshadows the current Blue-Red divide.

The “useless” doctor of Lourdes | Father Seán Connolly | “There is no other place in the Catholic world with so much suffering, and yet with so much joy, as Lourdes,” says Dr. Alessandro de Franciscis.

Contemporary Tyranny and Catholic Social Doctrine | James Kalb | The current situation of growing soft totalitarianism is too recent and too disturbing for its implications for Catholic social action to have been adequately understood and articulated.

Two Englishmen whose lives were commentary on the question of conscience | Stephanie A. Mann | For Thomas More, following his conscience led him to martyrdom; for John Henry Newman, following his conscience led him to become a Catholic.

An Evangelical theologian responds to Fr. James Martin, S.J. | Robert A. J. Gagnon | A consideration of Fr. Martin’s “seven ways” of responding to the Nashville Statement underscore the truncated gospel (or even anti-gospel) with which Martin operates.

When some Christians affirm traditional moral teaching, other Christians freak out | Carl E. Olson | The angry responses to the Nashville Statement reflect the sort of “moral therapeutic deism” that has increasingly dominated the public square in recent years.

A lucid, insightful tour through the principles of ecumenism | Dr. Jared Ortiz | Peter Kreeft’s Catholics and Protestants: What Can We Learn from Each Other? emphasizes that Christ’s “Church will become wholly whole when it becomes wholly holy.”

Honoring “the Grunt Padre” 50 years after his death | Jeanette Flood | Servant of God Father Vincent Capodanno died administering the sacraments to men in combat. Fifty years later, the cause for his canonization is underway.

What, the Devil? | Dr. Anne Hendershott | A new study reveals that Catholics are among the least likely to agree that Satan is a “living being.”

The Creative Catholic: Anthony Esolen | K. V. Turley | “Do not read a book, ever, just so that you can say clever things about it,” advises the prolific author and translator, “Read books for instruction and delight. If you don’t care for novels, read something else—but read good writers, not garbage.”

Transcendent truth, not leftist hypocrisy, needed to overcome racism and other evils | Carl E. Olson | The Left always seeks to claim and re-name the moral high ground, but has no objective foundations for its radical political project

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